YELP, INC (YELP)

EARNINGS RELEASE THURSDAY- AUGUST 8 (AMC)

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Avg Daily Volume: 6,541,460    Market Cap: 37.55B 
Sector: Technology    Short Interest: 2.71

EARNINGS EXPECTATIONS:  

     THIS QTR:   EPS:   .12/share    REV:  247.4/M
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     LAST QTR:  EPS:   .01/share     ACTUAL:   .02/share  (BEAT)
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     NEXT QTR:  EPS:   .64/share       REV: 262.9/M
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     FULL YR:     EPS:    2.15/share     REV: 1,020/M
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*These are the base metrics we will be watching against the actual release numbers
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BEAT/MISS RECORD: 43% OF THE TIME THEY BEAT ESTIMATES

PRIOR ‘JUMP ZONE’ MOVES (LAST 3 QTRS %) -17.16, -4.13, -32.57

POTENTIAL JUMP MOVE: 15%

Links To Latest News and Headlines

The antitrust lawsuit filed against Alphabet, Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) Tuesday by the Department of Justice alleges that Alphabet subsidiary Google uses anticompetitive practices to maintain a monopoly on the search and advertising market in the United States.The lawsuit points out Google's 80% market share in the U.S. search market. The Department of Justice also alleges Google locks out competitors through exclusionary agreements.Tepper On Google's Antitrust Risk: “This has been a headline risk for years, and it really doesn't change my outlook,” Mark Tepper, president of Strategic Wealth Partners, said on CNBC's “Trading Nation.”Google does have a monopoly on the search market, Tepper said, but questioned the effectiveness of breaking up the company. “Probably some more regulation, probably a fine, but what's the government going to do? Are they going to take business from Google and then give it to an even larger giant like Microsoft?”As investors wait to see if Alphabet's hand is forced, we look at some possible stocks that could win from a break-up scenario.Apple Inc: Given its competition against Google in phone search, maps, and smart speakers, Apple Inc (NASDAQ: AAPL) could be a natural winner in a split of Alphabet assets.Related Link: DoJ Officially Files Antitrust Lawsuit Against GoogleTripAdvisor: The CEO of TripAdvisor Inc (NASDAQ: TRIP) hasn't shied away from his belief that Google is hurting his company's business with some unfair practices.He recently told Bloomberg that Google Search makes the playing field uneven. Shares of TripAdvisor are down 35% in 2020 and have fallen more than 75% over the last five years.Booking Holdings: The owner of online reservation and recommendation sites, Booking Holdings (NASDAQ: BKNG) could be a winner from Google having to change its search practices. Booking Holdings owns Booking.com, Kayak and Priceline.com The company relies on people finding its results through search.Netflix: Alphabet is the owner of YouTube, which is one of the top streaming companies in the world.Netflix Inc (NASDAQ: NFLX) is a rival, but could also help assign a valuation to YouTube if it was split off as a separate company. Investors and analysts could use a pure play company like YouTube as a comparison of what Netflix is worth.Zillow: Online real estate company Zillow Group, Inc (NASDAQ: Z) is a company that gets traffic from Google search results. A change in Google's practices could benefit a company like Zillow.Garmin: GPS providers like Garmin (NASDAQ: GRMN) have seen the shift of drivers using their phone and apps like Google Maps as navigation devices.Garmin is a company to watch if Google has to make changes to its Google Maps feature.Yelp: One of the biggest cheers for the Department of Justice lawsuit came from Yelp Inc. (NYSE: YELP), a review platform that connects consumers with local businesses.”By systematically reducing the quality of its search results in order to entrench and extend its search and search advertising monopolies, Google is directly harming consumers,” the company said in a blog post.Yelp could benefit if Google has to change search practices and allow Yelp results to appear higher in consumers' searches.Photo courtesy of Zillow.See more from Benzinga * Options Trades For This Crazy Market: Get Benzinga Options to Follow High-Conviction Trade Ideas * Zoomtopia 2020: Zoom Video Unveils Zapps, New Features To Take On Microsoft, Google * 5 Apple Analysts On HomePod Mini, Pricing Of 'Premier 5G' iPhone(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

21 Oct, 2020 @ 16:00 by Yahoo! Finance

The coronavirus spurred the move away from big cities to get back to nature. People can accomplish this by buying a co-primary home.

(Bloomberg Opinion) — In the immortal words of Yogi Berra, it’s deja vu all over again.On Tuesday morning, the U.S. Justice Department filed its highly anticipated antitrust lawsuit against Google and its parent, Alphabet Inc. Given the antitrust division’s performance during the past four years — such as suing car companies on antitrust grounds because they opposed lower emissions standards — it wouldn’t have been a surprise if the Google suit had been an empty case designed primarily to please President Donald Trump, who is itching to punish Big Tech.But what was filed is a serious piece of work that makes allegations about the company’s purported abuse of its monopoly power that will be difficult for Google to refute. There is no doubt in my mind that it was put together by the department’s career civil servants and not political henchmen. It is the culmination of a sustained investigation that lasted more than a year. It was the kind of antitrust investigation, in other words, that led to the last truly important antitrust trial: the Microsoft case 22 years ago.Yeah, deja vu.That’s not the only similarity. Google has 90% of the internet search market — just as Microsoft had 90% of the operating system market in 1998, when the government sued it. It is legal to create a monopoly in the U.S.; the law basically says that if you build a mousetrap that is so much better than everyone else’s, good for you. What is not legal is using that monopoly power to stifle competition. The crux of the case against Microsoft was that it was using its Windows monopoly to crush Netscape, a company whose browser was competing against Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.Compare that with the government’s description of Google’s anticompetitive behavior in its complaint:For a general search engine, by far the most effective means of distribution is to be the preset default general search engine for mobile and computer search access points. Even where users can change the default, they rarely do. This leaves the preset default general search engine with de facto exclusivity. As Google itself has recognized, this is particularly true on mobile devices, where defaults are especially sticky.For years, Google has entered into exclusionary agreements, including tying arrangements, and engaged in anticompetitive conduct to lock up distribution channels and block rivals. Google pays billions of dollars each year to distributors … to secure default status for its general search engine and, in many cases, to specifically prohibit Google’s counterparties from dealing with Google’s competitors.This is exactly what the government charged Microsoft with doing two decades ago. Microsoft was fighting the browser wars by paying computer manufacturers such as Dell Inc. to preinstall Internet Explorer on its machines so that it would be the default browser from day one. This behavior was so blatantly anticompetitive that Microsoft was never able to put a benign spin on it during the trial. That’s why it lost — and why it no longer uses that tactic.This is one of those instances where those who ignore history are, indeed, doomed to repeat it. Google says that the lawsuit will harm consumers and is built on “dubious antitrust arguments” — the same defense Microsoft once offered. It has plenty of money to fight to the bitter end, and it probably will. But why did it choose such exclusionary arrangements in the first place? It should have been easy enough for Google’s lawyers and executives to read up on the Microsoft case to better understand the kinds of behaviors the government was likely to find objectionable.This case is not going to go away, no matter who becomes president in January. As I wrote recently, the Democrats are primed to take on Big Tech, as they showed when the House antitrust subcommittee released a scathing 450-page report outlining what it viewed as antitrust violations by Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Facebook Inc. as well as Google. Chances are, in fact, that if the Democrats win the election, the case against Google will be broadened to include allegations that it favored its own services in search results over those of its competitors. This is something that companies such as Yelp have been complaining about for years, though it is not a part of this lawsuit.When the Microsoft trial ended, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson ordered that Microsoft be broken up — the harshest remedy possible. Although the breakup order was overturned on appeal, the company ultimately had to agree to a long list of behavioral changes, plus three “independent, on-site, full-time computer experts to assist in enforcing” the judgment. The next few years weren’t lot of fun for anyone working for Microsoft.Google now has a choice. It can fight this lawsuit — plus the lawsuits state attorneys general are threatening to bring — for the next several years. It can see its reputation dented and further allegations aired. Its obstinancy — if that’s the path it chooses — will only embolden Democrats to write new laws aimed at curbing the power of Big Tech.Or it can learn from what happened to Microsoft and try to avoid that same fate. If Google truly believes it has the best product, then it shouldn’t need to pay Apple $8 billion to be the default search engine. It can work with Congress to help shape the new laws while acknowledging it has done things that should probably be banned.The longer Google fights, the worse it’s going to get. That’s the final lesson of the Microsoft trial.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Joe Nocera is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He has written business columns for Esquire, GQ and the New York Times, and is the former editorial director of Fortune. His latest project is the Bloomberg-Wondery podcast “The Shrink Next Door.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many young adults ditched their rentals and returned home to live with their parents. In fact, 52% of young Americans ages 18 to 29 are now living with at least one of their parents, that’s 26.6 million people in total as reported in July*. Reasons for moving home include college closures, unemployment, and the stress of lockdowns early in the pandemic, leaving many young adults looking for the opportunity to save money on rent, while having the security and comforts of living back at home with their parents. To assist adult children who want to get back out on their own, Yelp Inc. (NYSE: YELP) is offering to help “Re-Empty the Nest” with $2,000 to cover moving costs of select recipients.

Yelp (YELP) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

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